Environmental Science 204 DE

SYLLABUS

I strongly recommend that you print a copy of the Syllabus and the TV Guide Due Dates page (links under the START HERE FIRST Folder under the LESSONS tab). Acquaint yourself with the Angel Software Tutorials.

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INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION

Name:

Dr. Michael McVay

Office:

SC 115

Phone:

253.833.9111 X 4209

Office Hours:

By appointment. 

Email:

mmcvay@greenriver.edu

S-mail:

Science Division
Green River Community College
12401 SE 320th St.
Auburn, WA 98092-3699

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COURSE INFORMATION

Name:

Env Sci 204 -- Natural Science and The Environment Online-- 5 Credits

Prerequisite:

None, but each of the following are needed for success in this class:

·         Math 97 with a grade of 2.0 or better

·         ENGL 110 or eligible for ENGL 110

·         Availability of 2 hours of study time outside of class for every hour in class (i.e. 15-20 hours per week—about 2.5 hours daily)

·         Good reading, writing, oral communication, and critical thinking skills

·         Good study habits, a curious/active mind, and an interest in biology, ecology, and the environment are strong assets

Course Description:

Environmental Science is the interaction of physical and biological systems in the environment.  This class examines the scientific principles which are involved in modern environmental problems.  Scientific topics will include energy, climate, soils, water, and the dynamics of plants and animal populations and the communities they form.  For students wishing to obtain a broad picture of human activities and their relationship to basic processes of ecosystems.  Satisfies math/science distribution requirement for AA degree.

Discipline Specific  Outomces:

Students who successfully complete this course will be able

This course has five primary goals :

1.      Student identifies and evaluates important environmental issues that face us today.

2.      Student recognizes how we directly and indirectly affect the environment.

3.      Student develops concepts describing a sustainable society.

4.      Student correctly interprets statements made about the environment in the media.

5.      Student develops skills to work effectively with peers in finding solutions to environmental problems

6.      Summarizes the steps of the process of science.

These outcomes are demonstrated by:  1) active and respectful participation in small and large groups, 2) successful achievement on quizzes and exams, 3) short and long writing assignments, 4) case studies analysis, 5) field and laboratory studies and associated reports, and 6) an ever improving knowledge of the subject material through exemplification, illustration, and elaboration.

It seems each week we read in the newspapers of some environmental problem or issue that many times could have been avoided. I hope as a result of this class you will understand more of these problems and issues and will have tools to help solve the problems.

Campus-Wide Outcomes

Critical Thinking

1.  Student recognizes and uses essential components of effective reasoning to evaluate information and to improve the quality of his/her own thinking.

2.  Student provides reasons for the conclusions they reach and assess the relevance and adequacy of those reasons.

3.  Student demonstrates active listening and close reading skills.

4.  Student connects past learning with current topics.

These outcomes are demonstrated by: 1) short and long writing assignment, 2) lab write-ups, 3) case study analysis, 4) internet postings.

 

Responsibility

1.  Student demonstrates knowledge of and a willingness to accept stated/agreed upon expectations, policies, behavior, and procedures.

2.  Student demonstrates preparedness for class discussion of assigned readings.

3.  Student demonstrates an ability to understand and respond respectfully to perspectives offered by other students.

4.  Student shares knowledge and opinions with others in general class discussions.

These outcomes are demonstrated by:  1) handing in assignments in a timely fashion, 2) timely, appropriate, thoughtful responses to postings.

 

Written Communications

1.  Student demonstrates involvement with the material by expressing a clear sense of purpose, unity and focus in his/her writing.

2.  Student demonstrates clear organization of his/her thoughts in written form.

3.  Student demonstrates well-organized and logical writing with correct grammar and spelling.

4.  Student’s writing illustrates the connections between concepts developed in the course and topic specific applications.

5.  References are reported in standard format.

These outcomes are demonstrated by: 1) short and long writing assignments, 2) internet postings.

 

Quantitative Reasoning

1.  Student demonstrates problem-solving abilities in individual assignments and in assignments which involve working in groups of variable size.

2.  Student translates real-world data into symbolic representations, extracting and interpreting data from symbolic representations of real-world data.

These outcomes are demonstrated by: 1) data acquisition, summarization, and analysis, 2) case study analysis.

Text:

Environment: The Science Behind The Stories 4e. Jay Withgott & Scott Brennan, Pearson, Benjamin & Cummings, ISBN-10: 0-8053-9573-3 ( hard copy text or ebook is required.

The Text Book website: Environmental Science Place is recommended.

Method of Instruction:

This course is delivered over the web.

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ANGEL

Make sure to make yourself familiar with the Angel software. There are frames on the course homepage that contain several tutorial files (videos, text, student user guides etc.)  The "How To Use Angel" frame also contains a link describing the software/operating system requirements for Angel. In addition to these software requirements I require the use Microsoft Office 2007, a host of browser plug-ins like Windows Media Player, Real Audio, Flash, Shockwave, and Adobe Acrobat.

Angel uses your free @mail.greenriver.edu e-mail account. It is imperative that you activate your account and then choose to have e-mails sent to your e-mail account of choice. Your free @mail.greenriver account is the only reliable e-mail address I have for you as a student. If you don't activate this free account and/or set it up to have mail sent to the account forwarded to your e-mail account of choice, you run the risk of not getting responses from me. The GRCC link to setup and configure your free @mail.greenriver.edu account is http://www.greenriver.edu/studentemail/  For assistance in setting up this account you can call x2115. Incidentally, having such an address will make you eligible for special offers, for example on software prices, which are available only to students.

Dropboxes are not the same as sending me an e-mail. Dropboxes use the e-mail system, but I don't see your submissions until I go to the dropbox.

EVALUATION

FIRST EMAIL CONTACT (Assignments link)

After you have registered for the course, you must contact the instructor by email email on or before the date listed on the TV Guide Due Dates  page.  The first contact is worth 20 points.  Any first contact email received after the deadline will receive 0 points.  E-mail me if you have registered for the course late.  In addition, no grades will be recorded for you until I receive this email.  You must send it even if it is late and even if you receive no points.  You will find a detailed description of what should be in the First Email Contact in the UNIT ONE folder located under the LESSONS tab in your Angel classroom for this class. It is also described in the Week 1 Assignment's Document.

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TESTS and UNIT EXAMS 

All students will be required to take three Unit exams each of which will cover about one third of the course. The Unit exams will be found in the unit exam folder located in the root directory of the LESSONS tab. They will only be available for you to take from 6pm Saturday till 11pm Sunday. They will be timed and you will be allowed 50 minutes to take the Unit exams. You will be able to see your score after taking the Unit exams but the review feature in Angel will not let you see the exam results.  Each test will be a 50 question multiple choice exam with exam questions taken from all the materials used for this course.  Questions are worth two points each.  While none of the exams are purposely cumulative -- material introduced for previous unit tests is foundational and inseparable from new material. My point is you can't just take a test and forget the information.  If you have any questions about the material, please e-mail or call me and I would be happy to answer them.  Unit exams will be available Angel, select the UNIT EXAM folder located under the LESSONS tab in your Angel classroom for this class (this folder is not always visible). The unit exam must be taken within the time frame described on the TV Guide Due Dates  page (select the START HERE FIRST  folder located under the LESSONS tab in your Angel classroom for this class to find this document).  No make-ups will be given for any test.  Read this section for information about DEADLINES

Tests are based on the reading, case studies, and labs  the chapter notes (Lecture Notes  folder located in the relevant UNIT folder under the LESSONS tab in your Angel classroom for this class.) which are outlines of each chapter organized as a Power Point slide presentation.  You can print a copy of the outline if you wish.   Follow the directions in the Angel  window after you click on a particular chapter's lecture slides. These notes are a study aide for you. The week of an exam the assignment page and an announcement will list the chapters, case studies, discussion forum questions, homework questions, and labs the exam will cover.

The week prior to the Unit exam there will appear a practice test ( in the relevant UNIT folder located under the LESSONS tab in your Angel classroom for this class). The practice tests will cover the same material as the upcoming Unit exam. The practice tests are worth 50pts and consist of 50 questions just like the unit exam. The practice tests are open notes, open friend, open book, etc. The questions on the practice test may or may not be repeated on the unit exam. The practice tests are created from the same pool of questions as the unit exam and are a snapshot of the types of questions, difficulty level, and content covered on the unit exams. The practice tests provide you with an idea of what to expect on the unit exams.

See the TV Guide/Due Dates document in the START HERE FIRST  folder located under the LESSONS tab in your Angel classroom for this class to see the dates the practice test and unit exams will be available.

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DISCUSSION BOARD (Discussion Board link)

In a Discussion Board, I will post a topic for discussion/discovery.  The assignments for the discussion board are given each week in the link. I will also post them in the Discussion Board link to start your discussion.

The nature of the discussion boards and the mechanics involved will vary over the quarter, sometimes your responses will simply be observational, other times analysis and interpretation will be required.  You are required to critique two or more of your class member's responses. Your responses and peer critiques will be evaluated not only in terms of being more or less correct but also on clarity, depth, and breadth. Depth and breadth refer to the idea that responses and critiques need explanation. For example, "I like your answer" is not adequate. You can improve your responses to the discussion forum exercises throughout the time the forum is open. Just post your updated response in the appropriate forum and indicate that this is the response you want evaluated. (For example "this is my final post")

Your critiques of  a class member's post must address all of the content of his/her post and give your reaction to it.  In every forum there is a minimum of 2 or more required reflective, constructive,  instructive peer critiques. Less than two will result in point deductions. Just in case you can't tell. Critiques that say, "I like your answer" or similar un-noteworthy critiques don't count towards the "TWO."  Remember to follow the posting guidelines .

I will post the scores for the posts as well as an explanation/appropriate responses I employ to evaluate your posts. Postings must be made according to the time frame listed on the TV Guide/Due Dates  page or a 0 will be entered for that week's posts.  Read this section for information about DEADLINES.  Please read the guidelines for posting etiquette before you make your first post.  The internet is a dynamic and often unpredictable medium.  If you wait until the last minute and something happens that causes you to miss the midnight deadline (server problems, internet traffic, problems with your ISP, loss of power and/or any of a number of other possibilities) you will not get credit for your posts.  Students in previous classes have waited until the last minute to post often times between 11:30 and midnight on the due date, had something go wrong and the result would be not to get credit for that assignment.  I cannot guarantee that the server clock is accurate.  It has been as much as 20 minutes fast.  It is the server time stamp that determines a late post.  This is the only way I can track the time of your post.  Avoid problems and post early.  

The link to the Discussion Forum's will be located in the relevant UNIT folder under the LESSONS tab in your Angel classroom for this class.   Each posting assignment will be listed as a separate topic beginning with the assignment number and due dates on the TV Guide/ Due Dates page.  Once on the Discussion Forum, you will be able to view the assignment.  Read/print the assignment and compose your response in a word processor saving a copy on your hard drive.  To make it easier to read your responses please number them according to the questions.  After you have finished composing and saving your response, post your answer/responses either by typing directly into the reply window to the thread or Copy (ctrl C) your response from your word processor and place your cursor in the box provided in the discussion forum reply feature and select Paste From Word from the Edit Menu of the Inline HTML editor found at the top of the box where text is added. it.  Make sure the text says what you think it says and then click the SAVE button.   Composing your replies in a word processor is an especially good idea if you are using an ISP such as AOL which will automatically disconnect you after a relatively short period of inactivity.  If you do get disconnected your work will most likely be lost.  If something happens to the discussion group you will have a copy of your post available to put back in the group.  Something has happened more than once in the past requiring students to have to repost their responses.  When you save a file your operating system dates the file so if your post doesn't show up in the group you will be able to prove you completed it within the due date time frame.  Use these same processes to reply to a classmate's post.  If you don't understand the directions Email me and tell me what part(s) are confusing you and I'll be happy to explain them for you.  

The Discussion Board also has topics called Ask Dr. M and Student Interaction.  Please feel free to use Student Interaction to post questions and/or comments that can be addressed by your fellow students.   If you have any questions or comments about the course material, this is where you can have them addressed.  If you know the answer to a posted question, please reply. I encourage each of you to respond to each other's questions and comments. This is also the place where you may interact with or attempt to contact each other.  Feel free to introduce yourself to your fellow class members.  I would also encourage you to form study groups if at all possible.  They are an excellent way to learn the material.  Advertise your desire to do so in the Student Interaction.  Student Interaction is for your use only.  Participation in it will not be graded.  I monitor this forum but it is there for your use as class members.  Ask Dr. M is for questions for me although the most efficient way to get your question answered is via email.  

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OBSERVATIONAL DIARY

"Anyone with a genuine love of nature, an insatiable

curiosity about life, a soaring imagination, devilish

ingenuity, the patience of Job, and the ability to read

has the basic ingredients and most of the necessary

accouterments to become a first class biologist"

 

---- Vincent Dethier, To Know A Fly

 

All science begins with observation.  Observations lead us to ask the questions science tries to answer; in many cases, careful observations can provide the answers themselves.  To be able to carefully observe and accurately describe natural phenomena is the most important skill a scientist must acquire.

For most of us, observing the natural world is not part of our everyday lives.  Yet, we ourselves could not live in the absence of the organisms that surround and support us.  Equally importantly, the natural ,world around us can provide an endless supply of beauty, inspiration, and wonder -- but only if we take the time to observe it.

This exercise will help you become more Aware of the natural world.  Each week, you will make and record your observations according to the guidelines provided by the instructor.  By the end of the semester, you should have acquired the "basic ingredients and necessary accouterments" of the first class biologist.  If you were doing this in one of my traditional ground classes you would also be drawing what you observe. Imagine drawing a branch of salal with your eyes closed or as a negative space.

General Instructions:

During the first week of classes, you will select the location you will observe throughout the semester.  The location can be anywhere that is convenient -- on campus, near your workplace, or near your home. it must be outdoors, and must contain at least three different kinds of plants within reaching distance of where you sit (with several kinds of plants, you should have several kinds of animals as well, your patio isn't acceptable, I am looking for "natural settings").  You can visualize the "core" of your observation site as a cylinder as wide as your outstretched arms, extending down through the ground and up to the sky.

Each week you will spend a minimum of 30 minutes making and recording your observations.  As a general rule, you should plan on 15 minutes for observation alone and 15 minutes for writing.  I encourage you to set aside a specific time each week for this activity, and to include a "backup" for emergencies.  Don't leave your observation until the last half-hour before class -- not only will your work be of poor quality, but you may wind up having to sit out in the rain or snow!

What to observe:

The attached schedule gives you a brief statement of the kinds of observations to make each week.  I sugest you look up the "descriptor key word" for how to observe for each week in a dictionary. Sometimes you have to look at the word roots or alternate froms of the word in the dictionary. Week 9 is the week where I ask you to compare and contrast your observations over the quarter. For example, think about changes that occurred in your observational spot over the quarter, list them. As you consider these differences/changes, ask yourself if they fit into some pattern or trend. For example in my neighborhood the trash is picked up on the west side of the development on Thursdays and on the east of the development on Fridays. Quess where the neighborhood crows can be found on Thursdays? Fridays? Not all changes over the course of a period of time are because of changes in the seasons, weather, the phase of the moon, sometimes man inserts some impact on what is going on. Think about these things as you make your weekly observations and report them in your week9 posting with a haiku of course.

Recording your observations:

The entries you turn in each week will be consist of two parts as indicated on the schedule.  All entries will be posted in the weekly discussion forum designated for this activity (for example Observational diary week#?).  Each entry must begin with your name, the date and time at which you made the observations, a brief note about weather conditions (amount of sunlight, temperature, moisture), and the topic (from the schedule). Don't wait each week until the day your post is due in the designated discussion forum.

The "standard entry" will be two or three paragraphs describing the observations you make.  I expect you to use complete sentences and proper spelling.  I will grade you based on thoroughness and the care you used in making and recording your observations.  As a rule, each standard entry should be one page long (12 point, Font=Arial). Summarizing numerical and category data in tables is appropriate.

The "haiku" entries will consist of one haiku poem accompanied by a brief paragraph (three or four sentences) explaining the observations that led to the development of the poem.  As you may know, haiku is a Japanese form of poetry used to evoke a specific mood, often referred to as "the haiku moment." To write haiku, you must be sensitive to your surroundings, a careful and accurate observer, and concise and disciplined in the choice of words you use to express the "haiku moment."

A haiku poem always takes a specific form that consists of three unrhymed lines.  The first line contains five syllables, the second line has seven syllables, and the third line contains five syllables.  The poem itself usually makes an explicit reference to a season.  Here are two examples:

 

Clouds of Queen Anne's Lace

Rise above green summer fields,

Floating in the sun.

 

----------

 

A titmouse watches,

Grayish wings like winter skies

Above harvest moon.

 

I am not tied to a "reference" to a season or I am only interested in relevance to biology and environmental science. Alternatives should be relevant and logical references to topics in the text. I am open to your ideas too. For example;

 

Subatomic space,

protons, neutrons, electrons,

all fall colors made.

 

Grading of Observational Diary       

I will grade each entry according to two criteria: the thoroughness and care you demonstrate, and whether or not you turn the work in on time.  For each entry, you may receive one of the following grades:

 

On time, good work              = full credit = 10 "Point"

On time, poor work               = half credit = 5 "Point"

Late                                     = no credit   = 0 "Points"

 

If you make creative, reflective, and thoughful comments on two or more  of your peers weekly observations and haiku I will give you another 5 points for a total of 15 points possible each week.  For example,

·         a)when you read a classmate's haiku, close your eyes, take a few deep breaths to relax, then read the haiku, then read it again. Close you eyes again and note the first images, thoughts, ect that enter your mind. Tell everyone why you think those images, thoughts, ect entered your mind.

·         b) assess/evaluate your peers observation posting in terms accuracy, precision, depth, breadth, logic.

·         c)consider the significance and relevance of the observer's observations and/or haiku to a topic in the text, explaining your reasoning.

Post these ideas as replies to the particular students original post.

Schedule of observations

Date Due

How  to observe

Type of entries required

Week2 (OD1)

General

Standard, haiku, & peer critiques

Week3 (OD2)

No eyes

Standard, haiku, & peer critiques

Week4 (OD3)

Quantify

Standard, haiku, & peer critiques

Week5 (OD4)

Up close

Standard, haiku, & peer critiques

Week6 (OD5)

Down and dirty

Standard, haiku, & peer critiques

Week7 (OD6)

Up in the air

Standard, haiku, & peer critiques

Week8 (OD7)

Observer's choice

Standard, haiku, & peer critiques

Week9 (OD8)

Compare/Contrast

Standard, haiku, & peer critiques

CASE STUDIES

Case studies are a set of online assignments that you access in the relevant UNIT folder found under the LESSONS tab in the Angel Classroom for this class. These assignments will provide their own directions. Sometimes they will require you to access  alternative websites. In those instances you will be provided the complete URL (often as a link) where you will find exercises to complete. Your responses will be typed in a Word document that I will provide in the relevant UNIT folder. You will be instructed to either put your answer in a designated dropbox (usually as an attachment), you must post your answers by the times listed in the TV Guide/Due Dates document described above and below.

Some questions will require you to use references from the text (CC page 24) for example. Or from other resources you find on the web, various libraries, et cetera.

Reference your responses, for example CC p 376 or Pojar and Smith 1999. Legitimate references would include your Biology: Concepts and Connections text book, other texts and journals, a variety of online sources. However, the BiologyLabs On-line textbook and website and the Biology: Concepts and Connections website sites are not acceptable external references. 

Generally questions that ask you to develop a hypothesis do not require a reference. Questions that ask you to relate the data to the reader don’t require a reference, but questions that ask you to interpret the results, explain something, or provide implications and consequences of the results should be accompanied by a reference to substantiate your position. Questions that require you to explain your reasoning will require external references.  I should be able to locate the references. One of the easiest references to use is your text for example any discussion of the scientific method can be referenced like this (CC page 10). If you use a website provide the complete URL including http://www.insertwebsite domain . as an example.

See the following link to learning the proper citation format for different types of resources http://www.instruction.greenriver.edu/mcvay/B100/how_to_cite_sources_in_scientifi.htm

Remember when answering these questions, use your data. If you have actual numbers, use the numbers. Don't just tell me there is a trend, demonstrate the trend with the data. Summarize the data, sometimes this means you have to calculate a mean because you have multiple observations. This may mean you have to create tables and even plots of the data. Often times appropriate tables and figures can be employed. Describe the data, tell me what it says, briefly of course using the numbers. Analyze the data, tell me what the data means, what are the conclusions, is your hypothesis supported or rejected, what are the consequences and implications, what assumptions are you making et cetera.

For an example of correct summarization of data and use of references go to the START HERE folder under the LESSONS tab and look for the powerpoint presentation called "data presentation." 

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POINTS POSSIBLE

Unit Exams (3)

  300

Practice Test (3)

150

Discussion Group Postings

200

First Contact

    20

Observational Diary

120

 

 

Total

 

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GRADING

At the end of the semester, points will be totaled and grades will be distributed on a straight percentage basis according to GRCC's grading policy as follows. 

94-100%

A

4.0

90-93

A-

3.7

87-89

B+

3.3

83-86

B

3.0

80-82

B-

2.7

77-79

C+

2.3

73-76

C

2.0

70-72

C-

1.7

67-69

D+

1.3

63-66

D

1.0

Below 62%

 

0.0

Grades will be posted online after each of the three tests (Scores and Grades document found under the LESSONS tab) and I will post an announcement on the Announcements page when they are available.

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COURSE POLICIES

TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS

Any student who does not meet the technology requirements outlined in this syllabus should reconsider enrolling in the course.  No one will be refused but if you do not meet the minimums it will be difficult for you.

See the Angel tutorial documents on the course homepage for software/system requirements for Angel.

Online courses REQUIRE A WORKING KNOWLEDGE OF COMPUTERS AND OF THE INTERNET.  I will be teaching the content of the course, not computer/Internet skills. Students are expected to have a comfortable grasp of the technology before registering for this course. You are responsible for providing your own hardware, software, Internet provider, and e-mail address.   The following lists the minimum preferred requirements for computer hardware and software for both PC and MAC.

1.     During the quarter I am always amazed at how few science questions I am asked and "how many" technology questions I am asked. Each of the websites we will use this quarter have tech support pages where you e-mail your problem to someone who knows what they are doing. While I can help sometimes and while it doesn't hurt to ask, your first request for technology related problems should be those tech support sites followed immediately by an e-mail to me. If I can help I will but you will have already started the process for a surer solution in case I can't provide assistance.

2. GRCC is a Windows XP and MS Office 2007 campus. Support for non-PC computers is minimal. If you are using a MAC you will be at a disadvantage. It is not to say a MAC won't work, just that MAC users will have extra hoops to jump through. This is not an endorsement but, "Parallels Desktop is currently the best solution for running Windows, Linux, or any of many other operating systems alongside OS X."MacWorld.

Computer Needs for online courses

Some online classes have special hardware and software needs.  Check the instructor's class site (link on the Class Schedule page) to see if your course is one.  Otherwise the list below is a general list that should work for most online classes.

Personal computer running Windows XP or Vista.  Angel will not work on earlier versions of Windows.  It is possible to use the computers on campus to complete your course.

Macintosh running Mac OS X.  Angel will not work on earlier versions of the Mac OS.  Some courses will not work on a Macintosh -- check the instructor's site for the course. 

56k or higher speed modem (DSL or cable is even better) 

10 meg or more of space on your hard drive

CD-ROM drive

Internet access.

Your GRCC email address.  Go here if you don't know yours.

Browser software for online courses

If you're using Windows Angel Learning will only work on Internet Explorer 7 or FireFox 2 or 3. Get IE7 here and FireFox here.  Macintosh owners should use FireFox  -- Angel will not work on Safari, Opera, and other browsers.  Go here to get FireFox for Macintosh.  Scroll down to English (US) and choose the download for Mac OS X.

Angel works with IE8, If IE8 is run in compatibility mode.

 

Any student not having any of the above should consider not taking the course.  Students should not depend on Green River Community College to provide computer access for this class.  It is also strongly recommended that all students have basic computer and internet skills.

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MAKE-UPS

No make-ups will be given for any test.  They must be taken during the time frame listed on the TV Guide Due Dates  page on the website or a grade of zero (0) will be entered for that test.

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DEADLINES

The deadlines for tests, posts, and Case Studies are not negotiable.  

Tests  Practice tests and Unit Exams are available online.  Missing tests will be scored a 0.

Posts  Due dates for the posts are listed on the TV Guide Due Dates page.  In the case of posts, late is determined by the date stamp.  If it says Thursday for the reply to me or Monday for the reply to a classmate, it is late and you will receive a 0 for that post.  Please be aware that the internet is not a predictable medium.  If you wait until the last minute and something happens that causes you to miss the midnight deadline (server problems, internet traffic, problems with your ISP, loss of power and/or any of a number of other possibilities) you will not get credit for your posts.  Students in previous classes have waited until the last minute to post oftentimes between 11:30 and midnight on Wednesday or Sunday, had something go wrong and as a result, did not get credit.   I cannot guarantee that the server clock is accurate.  At various times in the past, it has been as much as 20 minutes fast.  It is the server time stamp that determines a late post.  This is the only way I can track the time of your post.  Avoid problems and post early..  

Case Studies  No Case Studies assignments will be accepted after the due date on the TV Guide Due Dates  page.

If you know you are going to miss a deadline, Email me.  I am willing to arrange for you to do the assignment (usually)early.   All due dates are detailed on the TV Guide Due Dates  page

Instructor Information | Course Information | Evaluation | First Contact | Tests | Discussion Board | Case Studies | LabsPoints | Grading | Course Policies | Technology | Make-up | Deadlines | Papers | Honesty | Plagiarism | Special Needs | Disclaimer 

PAPERS

All papers for any assignment requiring them (the Case Studies papers) must be typed..  Case Studies are due on the date listed on the TV Guide Due Dates  page.  A type written page is defined as a page typed with one inch margins on all four sides and using your word processor's default font (I prefer the ARIAL font and no larger than 12 point type.  If you cannot set your margins to one inch from the bottom of the page or if your printer will not print one inch from the bottom of the page (top, left and right margins are easily set to one inch), then include a paragraph on a second page (at least one quarter of the page long) to make up for the required length.  You should be able to set one inch margins on all sides except the bottom.  I will check to see if you set the margins correctly whenever you could and if the length of your paper would be at least one and one quarter pages if the margins had been set correctly.  Not following these directions will result in points being deducted.  Formatting (readability of your assignment) counts as a part of your grade so if you don't know how to do it, please ask for help.  See above for late penalties for papers. 

Instructor Information | Course Information | Evaluation | First Contact | Tests | Discussion Board | Case Studies | LabsPoints | Grading | Course Policies | Technology | Make-up | Deadlines | Papers | Honesty | Plagiarism | Special Needs | Disclaimer 

ACADEMIC HONESTY

Each student is expected to be in compliance with the college policy on academic honesty as described in the admissions catalog and the student handbook.  Any student cheating on an exam will receive a zero for that exam and may be reported to the appropriate campus authority for further disciplinary action.  No student is authorized to use copies of any of my exams for study or review purposes regardless of where you obtained them.  Any student caught with a copy of any of my exams will be treated the same way as someone caught cheating on a test.   It is expected that you will not share information about the tests with your fellow students.  Plagiarism on the paper, lab report, case study assignment, or discussion forum is considered cheating and will be dealt with as described in the Student Handbook.

Instructor Information | Course Information | Evaluation | First Contact | Tests | Discussion Board | Case Studies | LabsPoints | Grading | Course Policies | Technology | Make-up | Deadlines | Papers | Honesty | Plagiarism | Special Needs | Disclaimer 

PLAGIARISM

Plagiarism is the use of someone else's writing without giving proper credit-or perhaps without giving credit at all-to the writer of the original. Whether plagiarism is intentional or unintentional, it is a serious offense that can be easily avoided by giving credit to the original writer whenever you use a quote or when you paraphrase information.

Example of a Quote:  According to the text , "Pseudoscience (is) a theory or body of knowledge that portrays itself as a science but is not based on empirical observation or is inconsistent with broader scientific theory" (Morris and Maisto 1998, p. 11).

Often you will not be using an author's exact words, but will be using information from another author's (other than yourself) work. In this case, you are paraphrasing (using your own words) another person's work. This too must be cited. An example is given below.

Example of a paraphrase:  A psuedoscience presents itself as a science but its principles are not supported by scientific findings (Morris and Maisto, 1998).  

Instructor Information | Course Information | Evaluation | First Contact | Tests | Discussion Board | Case Studies | LabsPoints | Grading | Course Policies | Technology | Make-up | Deadlines | Papers | Honesty | Plagiarism | Special Needs | Disclaimer 

SPECIAL NEEDS

If you need course adaptations or special accommodations because of a disability, if you have emergency medical information, or if you have special accommodations that need to be shared with me in the event that the building (testing center) needs to be evacuated, please contact me. We will discuss ways of meeting your needs within the guidelines of GRCC policy on special needs. If you use an alternate medium for communicating please let me know as soon as possible so that appropriate accommodations can be made. Disability Support Services is located in LSC 277 and may be contacted at: (253) 833-9111, x 2631 or TDD at (253) 288-3359.

Instructor Information | Course Information | Evaluation | First Contact | Tests | Discussion Board | Case Studies | LabsPoints | Grading | Course Policies | Technology | Make-up | Deadlines | Papers | Honesty | Plagiarism | Special Needs | Disclaimer 

DISCLAIMER

Changes in the syllabus and/or due dates may be made at any time during the term by announcement of the instructor.  A revised syllabus and/or schedule of due dates may be posted on the web at the discretion of the instructor.  If changes are made in the syllabus, all students will receive a copy of the revised syllabus by email.

A printable list of due dates can be found by following the TV Guide Due Dates  link on the START HERE FIRST folder.

Summary

Assignments (see explanations in the body of this syllabus)

·         First Contact

·         Three practice tests

·         Three unit tests

·         5+ final posts in discussion forums

·         8 weekly Observational Diary entries

·         6-8 Case Studies

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